H-21 Flying Banana Complete

Finished the first kit of 2019, an Italeri H-21.  I’m glad this came out in 1/48 scale as it, with the H-13, were helicopters of my youth.

At the start of the year, I had some lofty goal to build two per month.  What was I thinking?!  Going to have to play catch-up now!

The kit overall will take some work to turn it into an AMS masterpiece.  There were a number of fit problems all around; the canopy to the fuselage, the cockpit in the fuselage, and the engine and bulkheads.  Other than sanding the fuselage seams I didn’t put too much work into the fit.  The place the rear rotor attaches also looks like it had something wrong with the molding.

After assembling the kit it was sprayed with my favorite lacquer primer from the can which produces a dark grey finish.  To try something different I then took some thinned Vallejo white primer and pre-highlighted sections of the kit.  I then sprayed the kit Vallejo Russian Green (it looked the best to me for a 50’s Army color)  and you can see the results of the pre-shading worked pretty well.

The decals went on great over a coat of Future and settled down very well to Solvaset.  I put most of the stencils on as the yellow just looked right on Olive Drab.   I had to cut the main stars and bars as I put the rear landing gear on first to paint them with the kit but the S&B go on under the rear gear mounts.  Oops!

A raw umber overall wash and when dried a coat of Testors Dullcoat to finish her off!

One other warning.  I broke four of the six rotors.  They are very fragile.  Managed to drill them out and add brass tubing to support but handle with care.

Fun to finally add a 1/48 chopper to my collection, one that I used to see at the airshows at Lowery AFB in Denver growing up!

 

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Hasegawa Typhoon Desert Scheme Painted

I finished painting the Typhoon.   I’ve been trying to push the end of the year builds so anything that might show up under the tree can be fair game to get started.

I used a combination of things I haven’t tried before; Blu-tack for masking the color boundaries and Vallejo Model Air paint.

The blu-tack is rolled out into long strings and flattened.  It is then pressed onto the aircraft as a masking guide for the paint.  As you paint along the edge of the blu-tack it forms a soft edge camo separation from the other colors.  I used this very effectively on an F-21 Kfir I built a few years back.  You can see the article here

https://dlloseke.wordpress.com/2015/03/15/f-21-painted-and-glossed/

This time the results were not as easy as the blu-tack and the Vallejo reacted by leaving a lot of residues which discolored the Vallejo.  You can see the process and the results in these photos…

After fiddling around with it I found good old mineral spirits were able to take the residue away but also removed a small amount of paint which showed through to primer where the paint was thin.

As a good side effect (which I’ll remember) is rubbing down the Vallejo paint job with mineral spirits gave it a nice faded look.  I might use this as a weathering step in the future.

The kit is now ready for a shot of future and decals.

Boys in Blue

NEXT!  They always told us not to say that to the next customer waiting at the airport as it made it seem like a fast food place.

But anyhow, Huey is finished its time to move on to the next project while the fire is in the belly.  I’ve been waiting to tryout a set of Vallejo US Navy colors my son bought me for Christmas and am opening up the Tamiya Birdcage Corsair and a bagged Monogram TBD-1.

The plan at this point is to build the TBD-1 out of the box.  I still need to purchase a set of decals for it but I see the Starfighter decals are available in places including eBay

The Corsair will be off of the Owl Decals Marine night fighters.  I have fallen in love with Owl Decals and have used them in a number of previous night fighter projects.  You can find those looking through my earlier blogs.

I’ll build it using the True Details cockpit detail set.

This Corsair kit has a bit of history.  Many years ago my wonderful daughter was 3 years old when she figured out how to get into daddy’s model display.  I know she knew how much I liked the models I built and wanted to play with them too.   It took me a few minutes to realize that what I heard was the sound of breaking styrene.  When I break a model I always say “They started out in pieces, we are just helping them return to their natural state”  I just had help this time

She got the Tamiya Fw-190A3, the Hasegawa F-14, and the Tamiya Corsair.  I have now built another Fw-190, this is the Corsair replacement (after 16 years), and the Tomcat is on the to do pile.  Then there will be harmony again in the styrene world.

I spent most of the weekend working around the house and the time I did get to work on the kits was sawing detail pieces out of resin blocks.  I was reminded that when I  was young I could have put the whole kit together in the time it takes me to prep a set of resin and etch for a kit.