DML Fokker Dr.1

First build started and finished in 2020.  The DML Fokker Dr.1 is a pretty simple build and after the Ju-88 of the previous, quite small in comparison.

The tiny fuselage and cockpit are very simple and went together well.   Although a two sets of photo etch are included in the kit, it is very hard stainless steel and getting the harnesses to bend was difficult.

 

Before assembly I painted the aircraft in the Fokker streaked pattern.  To do this I painted the whole of the fuselage and wings Vallejo Model Master RML 78.  I don’t know if this is exact but it looked pretty close to the blue I wanted.

After that, a good solid coat of Future floor polish was put on the surfaces and after it dried a few days I used Model Master enamel “Marine Corps Green” to do the streaking.  A wide brush with a bit of paint of which I would dip the paintbrush in odor free mineral spirits and carefully streak the paint.  Too much, the spirits took off the excess.  I was pretty impressed by how easy it was.

Tail plane and places for the decals were then painted, decals on, and we started assembly.  I used the Eagle Strike Fokker Dr.1 Aces (48102) for markings.

The instructions for the top of the middle wing, where all of the guns go, was very unclear.  So I just put things in around where I thought they should go.

Overall a pretty easy stress free build for the first multi-wing aircraft I have built in a long time.

 

ProModeler Ju-88A

Please see the previous post for information on the Aires aftermarket cockpit add-on.  We begin construction from there.

After getting the cockpit completed I went to finish the rest of the kit.  I mostly followed the instructions with the exception of adding the glass and delicate things like antennas until after painting.

The kit requires you put together the engine nacelles with the landing gear inside.  No way to add the internal parts of the gear until after painting but I was able to leave off the end of the gear so it was easy to mask.

The other item left off was the front of the engine nacelles.  I did this so you can leave off the exhausts until after painting.  The big holes in the front of the nacelles also make good finger holes for holding the model while finishing!

The kit required some filling and sanding.  Especially at the wing tips which are separate parts.

The ailerons were also molded separate but I warn you don’t try to  model them up or down as the aileron hinges in the bottom of the wing won’t fit.

I wanted to do the desert markings with these neat squiggles in two different colors.

I have been successful before using blue tack as a masking device.  The idea is to paint the squiggle color, roll the blue tack into thin ropes, apply to the model, and spray over it.  Here is an example of a Bf-110 I did using this method.  It worked pretty sweet and  saved me from free-handing it.

In the case of the Ju-88, I don’t know what the issue was but I  suspect the blue tack sticks really good to Vallejo paint and I had a lot of trouble cleaning off the blue tack, to the point I  was destroying some of the painting.  If you look at the second photo  here you can see the embedded blue tack.

So I bit the bullet and started over.  I decided to pre-highlight the color starting with dark gray primer and then using an airbrush I gave areas a thinned coat of Vallego white primer.  I figured this was a desert craft and the resulting colors would need to be lightened somewhat.

This Ju-88 has quite the squiggle (Wellenmuster) camo on the bottom of the aircraft.  To complete this I purchased a set of fillable pens that I could put some of my Vallejo RLM70 into and basically draw the camo on the bottom.  Not perfect but pretty okay and it is on the bottom!  I think next time I  would try the .7mm pens instead of the 2mm tip.

Freehanding the camo on the upper was a bit of a challenge as I was having airbrush issues.  However, they were soon resolved and I am happy with the result.

After decaling and a coat of future we grubbed her up and added all of the other parts.  Shes a big girl on the shelf.

Since I have about another 4 of these 1/48 Ju-88s I learned a lot about putting them together.  Overall a decent kit with lots of details.  Add the Aires details and you have a winner.

 

 

 

Aires Ju-88A resin-etch set

I started the ProModeler Ju-88A around Christmas time so much of the work here was around the first of the year.

The parts replace the kit components in a very nice fit.  The set was painted with a variety of paint, mostly centered around Vallejo ModelAir.  After airbrushing with a slighly lightened mix of RLM66 I added a bit more white and highlighted some of the features.

After putting the cockpit together, including a nice set of harnesses, I fitted the cockpit section together and tested the fit.  The set required some size reduction using the old trusty belt sander but once cleaned up fit like a glove into the kit parts.

Normally to improve fit I would attach the sides of the front section to the sides of the rear section and  then glue the completed sides together but on this kit it made more sense to capture the cockpit details in a completed front section and then glue it to a completed rear section as I needed to make sure all of the front parts, including canopies, fit well.

There are other details in the set like the guns that will be added later once the kit is completed.  But overall I enjoyed building the cockpit.

I’ll cover the kit construction in the next installment.

 

Twenty-two years in the making!

Pardon the long post.  I had to tell the story!

We all have that one kit we start, put away, take back out, put away again, etc. until they are done.  Mine was a DML Fw-190A-8/R11, the Nachtjager version, and it took 22 years.

I bought this wonderful kit in 1997 at our now-defunct Bridgetown hobbies.  The hobby show closed a number of years back and is now a place to buy weed.  I think it cost me $27.00.  I took it home and with the help of a Verlinden Fw-190 detail set started it right away.

The Verlinden set has a bunch of great details.  Tail and fuselage hatches, wing guns, cockpit details, and a way to cut a hatch on the kit and show what appears to be a partial look at the engine.   I didn’t want to have a partial engine and started a quest to find a 1/48 scale BMW-801 and found one in the CMK variety.  The one thing I would discover later is that the CMK kit does not have exhaust pipes.  (More on this later)

This first part of the kit through building the cockpit, hatches, and adding the wings went pretty quick.  A tip here is that for DML Fw-190s you should glue the top halves of the wings to the fuselage first and then add the lower wing.  It goes together without the need for gap filing much better.

So now I reach my first dilemma which causes me to put the kit away for a while, how do I mount the engine.  The CMK kit provides a wonderful engine ring mount but no supports back to the main body of the aircraft.  Once I got the kit back out I developed my own which are the results of these previous post.

I basically studied drawings of the kit and out of brass tube soldered my own engine mounts.  Thes next 4 links go back to 2013 and my effort to make engine mounts.

https://dlloseke.wordpress.com/2013/06/19/fw-190a-8r-11-engine-mounts-2/

https://dlloseke.wordpress.com/2013/06/26/brass-soldering/

https://dlloseke.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/fw-190-engine-mount-is-soldered/

https://dlloseke.wordpress.com/2013/07/18/fw-190-engine-mount-ready-to-finish/

Now that I had an engine and I had engine mounts the next dilemma, no exhaust pipes on the CMK kit.  The Fw-190 went on the shelf while I tried to figure out a good source for exhausts or drawings.

Then in the last couple of years, Eduard has released a set of Fw-190 kits that included engines with exhausts.  Purchasing one of these kits to copy the exhausts caused me to get the kit back out and then  I discovered Rexx exhausts for the Fw-190 and sought to procure a set of these.  They were designed to copy the Eduard exhausts and I thought I had my problems all solved.

I was wrong!  As I started working with the engine to place it on the mounts, on the aircraft, so that I could assign the exhaust I begin to sense that either the engine or the aircraft was out of scale; the engine was too big for the front of the DML kit.  Given the original plan was to cut away most of the forward panels on the aircraft I was seeing the engine would not even fit within the few panels I had remaining.

 

Now, 22 years from the start of the kit, I had to make a command decision.  I would finish the kit without the engine.  But what to do with all of the Verlinden pieces in place and the other panels I had cut open?

I used the back of the CMK engine and made a stump of an engine to go on my engine mounts, then cemented the front of the engine compartment onto the fuselage with the stump in it.  I ran some wires from the fuselage to the stump to represent control wires top make the space under the fuselage guns look a bit busier.

After adding the front of the aircraft back on I proceeded to complete the kit.  It was airbrushed with Vallejo acrylics, weathered with and oil dot weathering, and grubbed up with pastels.

I had to place the DML decals in the window to remove a bit of their yellowing but was totally amazed how well the 20+-year-old decals went on the kit and settled down with a bit of Solvaset.

I am very pleased I got this kit done.  It is a busy kit, lots of things open, and most of it open for many years!

Next I am  going to build the Eduard kit with a Brassin engine set so we will have our Fw-190 with an open BMW-801

Desert Done

Happy Old Year!

I finished the two desert aircraft just under the 2018 clock.  This makes only five models for me this year, off my normal of about 7 – 8.

The Hasegawa Cardoor Typhoon was finished in a rare desert scheme which required I paint a Skyblue “Y” and find other decals.  The serial number isn’t correct for this Typhoon and I was too cheap to go buy the decals needed to just have the serial number.  I think the British desert scheme turned out very nicely.  Vallejo paints with a final overcoat of Testors Dull coat after oil dot weathering and pastels.

The A-20 is the AMT kit built as a “-C”.  The markings are based on those found in an A-20 book I have and finally replicated by FCM in their new decal sheet.  Paints are all Model Master with the exception of a jar of Floquil Military Colors (Desert Sand) I have had on the shelf for 10+ years waiting to do this scheme.

Here are the photos of the Typhoon and A-20.

What I learned in these builds….

  • the Blu-tack I use to help with the camouflage demarcation reacts and leaves a residue with Vallejo paints.  It can be removed carefully with mineral spirits.  The mineral spirit wash also lightens the Vallejo – might be a good weathering tool in the future.
  • I probably should have penciled in the desert sand over splotches on the A-20 as this would have kept them tighter and more like the original.
  • Primer straight from the can is best instead of trying to decant it to the airbrush.

Finally, here is the other part of the 2018 set of completions.  See you next year;

   

Wow, it’s November!

My last post was in June.  I just finished the TBD that I started early summer.  Normally I finish 7 or 8 kits per year, this year two so far.  I have to get moving here over the next month and 1/2.

Per my last post I am building an old Monogram TBD I found in a bag on eBay.  It turned out to be pretty good kit considering it’s age.  I didn’t put too much work into it other than rescribing the fuselage panel lines.  The extra work was around the corrugated wing panels which requires some fancy work on the leading edge with a round file between the raised detail to get rid of the seam.

The new thing to try was a concerted effort at pre-shading. The corrugated wing panels called out for it.  After decanting some primer from a spray can and using the airbrush to prime I used a dark grey to fill in the depressions around the ribbing as well as highlighting other areas.  Remember the pre-shading is designed to provide contrast when the paint is put on the model.  Here’s a view of pre-shading…

I used Vallejo Model Air to cover the model.  For this particular model the paint went on very well and the pre-shading highlights turned out great.

Decals were the Starfighter “TBD-1 Devastators in War Paint” and represent Ensign Gay’s famous aircraft in the battle of Midway.

A quick raw umber wash to dirty it up a bit and we are done.

Now to get crackin’ and get a few more done by the end of the year.

Hasegawa Hurricane Mk. IIc – Night Hurricane – Hairspray chipping method

I built three single seat black aircraft and used them to test paint chipping techniques.  This one is the Hasegawa Hurricane Mk. IIC Night Hurricane and my chipping method of choice was to use hairspray over aluminum Alclad before black paint.

The kit was built straight out of the box and went together well.  The way the wing is engineered to support different versions caused some filling and sanding around the optional parts and where the wing connected to the fuselage.

The cockpit was a pretty good representation of the complexity of the real thing however since the canopy is molded as one piece you won’t see much inside anyway.

The model was then primed with primer from a can (see previous posts) and once dry the kit was sprayed with Alclad primer in areas I planned to chip.  Note I didn’t cover the entire kit with aluminum which forced me to remember where the silver was so later when over sprayed with black paint I knew where to chip.  I also covered parts of the fabric covered areas with the original interior color since I guessed that this area wouldn’t chip silver since it wasn’t metal.

  

The model was then given a coat of cheap hairspray.  Everything I read online about this method suggests using the cheapest hairspray because it is not generally perfumed – no additives.  This hairspray was bought in the travel section at my local store ( because I’m cheap and didn’t need a big can!)  I decanted the hairspray and put it on with my airbrush.

After the hairspray cured for a couple of days I over coated it with Vallejo ModelAir Black.  You need to use an acrylic (water washable) paint for this to work and once painted you only have a few hours to work before the paint gets hard.  I waited 2 hours and as I found out the black paint was still pretty soft after two hours (this was a surprising but good thing).

IMPORTANT NOTE:  You need to put the paint on in a number of light coats and let them set between coats.  In a few places on the model where I painted a part off the model and tried to put one coat on the paint wound up cracking ever so slightly.  I believe this was because the “wet” of the acrylic melted the hairspray and caused it to flow a bit while the paint was setting.

So where is the silver?  Using my iPad to took pictures of the kit before black so I could remember the areas over-sprayed aluminum thus avoiding over-spraying the whole kit with aluminum and knowing where to chip.

After the paint had set a couple of hours I took a wide soft brush and using water coated a few sections of the black paint.  I was expecting the paint to set for a bit and then I would need to use my implements of destruction I had standing by to take it off.  What surprised me was in putting on more water the paint suddenly started coming off quickly and in big chunks.

So from this point, as I placed water carefully on the black paint, I could use the paint brush to slowly and randomly take paint off the silver areas.  I also used this fiberglass brush my artist daughter gave me to chip away at panel lines since it provided a good wide stiff straight line from which to take paint off.

Overall I’m really pleased with the result and will look forward to tuning the skill.  This also worked really well chipping the propeller and I could see using it in other areas where you might want to highlight two color changes (color over primer).

The one thing to look out for in my case is the paint really melted and came off fast.  Although it didn’t really come off, it just kind of melted and flowed together in different areas.  If I look closely I can see where the paint looks a bit thicker where it bunched up.

Decals were off an OWL Nightfighter Experts (#48014)  sheet.  I love OWL decals, they come off the paper quickly and go on really thin.

 

What did I learn;

  • Hairspray work very well for chipping
  • Overcoat colors need to have many thin coats as to not melt the hairspray
  • Paint can come off (or maybe move) in big areas if you are not careful