ProModeler Ju-88A

Please see the previous post for information on the Aires aftermarket cockpit add-on.  We begin construction from there.

After getting the cockpit completed I went to finish the rest of the kit.  I mostly followed the instructions with the exception of adding the glass and delicate things like antennas until after painting.

The kit requires you put together the engine nacelles with the landing gear inside.  No way to add the internal parts of the gear until after painting but I was able to leave off the end of the gear so it was easy to mask.

The other item left off was the front of the engine nacelles.  I did this so you can leave off the exhausts until after painting.  The big holes in the front of the nacelles also make good finger holes for holding the model while finishing!

The kit required some filling and sanding.  Especially at the wing tips which are separate parts.

The ailerons were also molded separate but I warn you don’t try to  model them up or down as the aileron hinges in the bottom of the wing won’t fit.

I wanted to do the desert markings with these neat squiggles in two different colors.

I have been successful before using blue tack as a masking device.  The idea is to paint the squiggle color, roll the blue tack into thin ropes, apply to the model, and spray over it.  Here is an example of a Bf-110 I did using this method.  It worked pretty sweet and  saved me from free-handing it.

In the case of the Ju-88, I don’t know what the issue was but I  suspect the blue tack sticks really good to Vallejo paint and I had a lot of trouble cleaning off the blue tack, to the point I  was destroying some of the painting.  If you look at the second photo  here you can see the embedded blue tack.

So I bit the bullet and started over.  I decided to pre-highlight the color starting with dark gray primer and then using an airbrush I gave areas a thinned coat of Vallego white primer.  I figured this was a desert craft and the resulting colors would need to be lightened somewhat.

This Ju-88 has quite the squiggle (Wellenmuster) camo on the bottom of the aircraft.  To complete this I purchased a set of fillable pens that I could put some of my Vallejo RLM70 into and basically draw the camo on the bottom.  Not perfect but pretty okay and it is on the bottom!  I think next time I  would try the .7mm pens instead of the 2mm tip.

Freehanding the camo on the upper was a bit of a challenge as I was having airbrush issues.  However, they were soon resolved and I am happy with the result.

After decaling and a coat of future we grubbed her up and added all of the other parts.  Shes a big girl on the shelf.

Since I have about another 4 of these 1/48 Ju-88s I learned a lot about putting them together.  Overall a decent kit with lots of details.  Add the Aires details and you have a winner.

 

 

 

Aires Ju-88A resin-etch set

I started the ProModeler Ju-88A around Christmas time so much of the work here was around the first of the year.

The parts replace the kit components in a very nice fit.  The set was painted with a variety of paint, mostly centered around Vallejo ModelAir.  After airbrushing with a slighly lightened mix of RLM66 I added a bit more white and highlighted some of the features.

After putting the cockpit together, including a nice set of harnesses, I fitted the cockpit section together and tested the fit.  The set required some size reduction using the old trusty belt sander but once cleaned up fit like a glove into the kit parts.

Normally to improve fit I would attach the sides of the front section to the sides of the rear section and  then glue the completed sides together but on this kit it made more sense to capture the cockpit details in a completed front section and then glue it to a completed rear section as I needed to make sure all of the front parts, including canopies, fit well.

There are other details in the set like the guns that will be added later once the kit is completed.  But overall I enjoyed building the cockpit.

I’ll cover the kit construction in the next installment.

 

Desert Done

Happy Old Year!

I finished the two desert aircraft just under the 2018 clock.  This makes only five models for me this year, off my normal of about 7 – 8.

The Hasegawa Cardoor Typhoon was finished in a rare desert scheme which required I paint a Skyblue “Y” and find other decals.  The serial number isn’t correct for this Typhoon and I was too cheap to go buy the decals needed to just have the serial number.  I think the British desert scheme turned out very nicely.  Vallejo paints with a final overcoat of Testors Dull coat after oil dot weathering and pastels.

The A-20 is the AMT kit built as a “-C”.  The markings are based on those found in an A-20 book I have and finally replicated by FCM in their new decal sheet.  Paints are all Model Master with the exception of a jar of Floquil Military Colors (Desert Sand) I have had on the shelf for 10+ years waiting to do this scheme.

Here are the photos of the Typhoon and A-20.

What I learned in these builds….

  • the Blu-tack I use to help with the camouflage demarcation reacts and leaves a residue with Vallejo paints.  It can be removed carefully with mineral spirits.  The mineral spirit wash also lightens the Vallejo – might be a good weathering tool in the future.
  • I probably should have penciled in the desert sand over splotches on the A-20 as this would have kept them tighter and more like the original.
  • Primer straight from the can is best instead of trying to decant it to the airbrush.

Finally, here is the other part of the 2018 set of completions.  See you next year;

   

Desert Pink on A-20 Havoc

In conjunction with the Typhoon (previous post), I have been working on painting a desert A-20 Havoc.

The camouflage and markings are what I once heard called reverse lend-lease.  When the US got into the war we took back a few of the A-20s we gave to the British.

The camo starts with the standard British Euro bomber colors.  This is in contrast to the normal British desert colors used on the Typhoon in the previous post.  Instead of Middle Stone / Dark Earth / Azure used on the desert aircraft, the initial colors are Dark Green / Dark Earth / Medium Sea Gray.

When the US took back the A-20s for use in the desert they quickly applied their markings and did a hurry-up camo job to get it desert ready.

The decals from FCM (48051) represent the British marking with US stars and serial numbers painted over the British roundels.  The US then oversprayed the whole aircraft with desert sand including parts of the roundels.  The markings represent the markings on the old Revell 1/72 A-20 and I have been waiting to do this in 1/48 for a long time.  I’m glad FCM created the decals as I was prepared to roll my own and I have even had a jar of desert pink on hand that was never opened until now.

 

I spent a couple of hours this afternoon overspraying the A-20.  After it dries we will be onto a coat of future and weathering.

Hasegawa Typhoon Desert Scheme Painted

I finished painting the Typhoon.   I’ve been trying to push the end of the year builds so anything that might show up under the tree can be fair game to get started.

I used a combination of things I haven’t tried before; Blu-tack for masking the color boundaries and Vallejo Model Air paint.

The blu-tack is rolled out into long strings and flattened.  It is then pressed onto the aircraft as a masking guide for the paint.  As you paint along the edge of the blu-tack it forms a soft edge camo separation from the other colors.  I used this very effectively on an F-21 Kfir I built a few years back.  You can see the article here

https://dlloseke.wordpress.com/2015/03/15/f-21-painted-and-glossed/

This time the results were not as easy as the blu-tack and the Vallejo reacted by leaving a lot of residues which discolored the Vallejo.  You can see the process and the results in these photos…

After fiddling around with it I found good old mineral spirits were able to take the residue away but also removed a small amount of paint which showed through to primer where the paint was thin.

As a good side effect (which I’ll remember) is rubbing down the Vallejo paint job with mineral spirits gave it a nice faded look.  I might use this as a weathering step in the future.

The kit is now ready for a shot of future and decals.

Typhoon Primed

A quick update on the Typhoon.  (Lots of modeling done this weekend) This is a continuation from post https://wp.me/p3DBTC-iI

The Typhoon required very little seam sanding.  I really enjoy those shake and bake kits.

I put the primer in and I have started painting (more on that in next posts).

I have been using Dupli-color automotive primer.

Normally I decant it (spray it into a cup) then use my airbrush.  Sometimes this process results in the primer going on way to dry and grainy and in the last set of kits I built this required additional sanding to take out the graininess.

This time I decided what the heck I’ll just spray the primer on straight from the can and Wow! what a nice coat.  Goes on thin and dries very smooth – just waiting for paint.  No need for sanding this time.

 

Next, me, Mr. Iwata, and Mr. Vallejo get together for some color!

A-20 Havoc just putty in my hand

This is  a continuation from a previous post which can be referenced here https://wp.me/p3DBTC-iP

The A-20 build continues.  I am at the point where I need to fill the seams and prime.  Although this kit went together well there were a few areas the needed attention

In order to get the nose section to fit the rear section, I needed to glue each respective nose piece to its side of the fuselage.  This allows you to align the parts together.

The trade-off is that the nose section no longer closes completely and the transparency on the front which cements to the nose section is suddenly not wide enough.  Using a medical clamp I had to squeeze the nose section just ever so slightly and then cemented the canopy on and it mostly fit.

I use Milliput medium grade putty.  Mix the two pieces together, apply, take a cotton swab with water and smooth it out, and some light sanding at the end.  The application with the cotton swab has made it very easy to get the putty into the places it needs to be without having to do a lot of sanding later.  If you look at where the vertical joins the horizontal in this picture you can see a light bit of putty pressed in and smoothed over with a cotton swab.

Finally had to put the gear together before I could add the nacelles which will require some masking over the gear when painting.  The gear is very intricate and looks nice once the nacelles are on.  There isn’t much else inside the nacelles unless you want to pop for Eduards A-20 interior set.

Next lots of transparency masking.