Huey is done

I don’t make very many helicopter models.  Built this Huey to try out the Antarctic decals I had for many 1/72 scale copters and started with the Huey.

A couple of uh-ohs during decaling;

  • drop the copter and had to fix the fuselage split at the nose and polish it up and spray it again.
  • grabbed the back end while one of the number decals was still soft from the decal set
  • the only decals I didn’t use Solvaset on silvered really bad (NAVY on doors).  I guess the use of a gloss acrylic paint didn’t stay that glossy

The copter was painted, decalled, and overcoated with Testor’s dullcoat.  The orange actually looks pretty good all said and done.  It was a real pain putting in all of those windows and one fell out while I was trying to remove the masking which made for some fun.

Other than a quick burnt umber wash there was no weathering done on this.

I was going to start the H-19 next in same antarctic colors but I had some much fun I’m going back to 1/48 scale for a couple of kits (Tamiya Corsair and Monogram Devastator).  I’ve been dying to try out my Vallejo US Navy colors.

Huey, Dewy, And Louie (Well Huey…)

Finished the two main colors of the Huey over the Mother’s Day weekend (in and amongst Mom slave day – another post maybe!)

I am building a set of 1/72 Antarctic helicopters, the Huey is first.  Markings will be based on the set of Max Decals.  The sheet covers quite a number of 1/72 Antarctic helo markings.

After sanding out all of the gaps I sprayed black, taped her up, and got ready to spray Model Master Acrylic International Orange.  That is when I realized the tail rotor warning decals did not come with the yellow band and I had to apply that too!

Despite thining, the Model Master paint wound up going on a little thick to cover up the Mr. Surfacer I used to level the gaps.  I debated whether to prime or not and got in a hurry and didn’t prime.  The result was a thicker coat than I wanted and a few spots the tape pulled the paint up (which has not happened to me in a long time).

The overall orange looks pretty good however and I’ll be onto decaling and weathering right after a bit of touch up.

 

Time to re-engage the hobby and build

It’s been months since I blogged.  So much of my free time is spent doing other things like Scouting and Study that I keep putting off going to the workspace and building.  I build in the garage which, even though we are in Oregon, can still get pretty chilly in the winter. (always excuses)

We are rejoining the building of a UH-1D in antarctic markings using an AMT UH-1D in1/72 scale and the Antarctic copter decal sheet from MAX (see the previous post).  Previously I was starting down the path to creating a cockpit for this but I found an Eduard etch set that, while more established for the UH-1N version seemed to work the few things I needed it for; instruments, seat belts, exterior tiny parts.

I have used the photo-etch as a pattern to create the cabin seating out of masking tape painted red.  It is much more convincing than the etch and required I create supports for the tape using the etch “legs” to get it all together.  I am happy with the results

  

Note the photo etch tie downs that I had to drill out pockets for.  I have started the back seating arrangements.

Back seats are ready with some trimming.  The whole assembly plus the engine unit are now ready for mounting inside the fuselage.

Next steps sanding the seams and getting some black on her.

Creating a cockpit

In this world of photo-etch and resin enhancements for model kits, I have not tried to do any scratch building for years.  Instead, the strategy has been to hone my painting and highlighting skills to create wonderful renditions of scale interiors.  As discussed in my last post I started down that path with my current build, a UH-1D Huey by purchasing a UH-1B etch set.  They are not compatible with the “D” model so off to real modeling we go.

  

I used the “B” set etch instrument panel as a form from which to start making an interior.  Armed with my micro drills and trusty Waldron punch set I am creating the instrument panel.

I am also experimenting with adding small switches or handles.  I poke a small hole in the plastic then add a small radius wire with super glue and clip off with sharp scissors when set.

I also added a scratch a pair of rudder pedals when the kit’s set went flying from the tweezers and lost to the garage monster.

A lesson in Hueys

Started my next kit today.  Actually a set of kits of Antarctic helicopters.  I’ve always wanted to build the old Revell SO4S with its orange plastic because of the overall international orange scheme but alas I’m too cheap to pay the collector’s prices.

But a few years back an Irish company Max Decals released a set of 1/72 scale decals covering a multitude of Antarctic color schemes for various helicopters.  It has been a while since I have built a copter and so why not build three; and UH-1D, and H-34, and an H-19.

I am starting with the UH-1D.  I was able to buy an old AMT kit which is exactly the same as the Italeri kit, to finish in the international orange colors of VX-6.

I also purchased an Eduard etched set for these kits.  Trouble was the set for the 1/72 Huey is for a UH-1B.  Same thing right, D vs. B?

Well no.  So I spent an afternoon googling images of the two versions and contemplating whether to use the Eduard set on the D.  Here are notable differences;

  • The B has a single window side door, the D two windows (longer door)
  • The B has a totally different engine housing
  • The B kit has armored seats- not needed on the D antarctic version.

I compared the parts on the B etch and figured I could only use a few items like the instruments panel and seatbelts.  And so I decided that I’d put away the etch for eBay or another day and do the unthinkable – scratch build the interior.  It has been awhile since I have scratched a 1/72 scale kit cockpit.  This should be fun!