Desert in the Winter

Time to start a couple of desert aircraft.

Time is ticking for completing kits this year and although I’m not a really focused by quantity I haven’t built very many this year so we’ll do a couple of kits mostly out of the box.  I’m going to try and keep the AMS (Advanced Modelers Syndrome) down a bit.

I’ve always wanted to do the camouflage on the old Revell A-20 kit, the reverse lend-lease aircraft that was in British desert camo with stars painted over the British Roundels and the aircraft oversprayed with desert pink.  I’ve has a bottle of fresh desert pink paint for over 15 years waiting for the day.

With the release of the new FCM decals for the A-20, I can finally take my AMT A-20C and create this in 1/48 scale.  Note that there is a picture in the Douglas Havoc and Boston book (Crowood Aviation Series: ISBN 1 86126 670 7) on page 122 showing the US aircraft on this sheet together.

I am building the A-20 right out of the box (with the exception of the exhausts – for another post).  Cockpit, bombers position, and rear gunner areas will be presentable as I plan to keep the canopies closed and you won’t see much.

The AMT kit has a separate nose front so that the same kit can support the A-20B/C/G/J versions.  I have cemented the nose to the fuselage half rather than following the instructions which had you cement the nose halves together first.  This is recommended as it really helped align the bombers positions in the aircraft.

Interiors are painted Floquil British interior green from an old bottle I’ve also had hanging around for many years.  (I miss those colors).  Details were hand painted and we are about ready to start closing up the fuselage.

I’ve also started the Hasegawa car door Typhoon.  Apparently there were only three Typhoons used as test aircraft in the desert theater and I plan to mark up one of them with those markings.  There are a few decals sheets out there with those markings but I might see if I can cobble together the correct markings from spare decals on hand.

The cockpit is simple and ready to implant in the Typhoon’s fuselage as well.

Next, closing them up!

 

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