Marine Corsair

Finally, another kit completed this year.  That makes 3 this year.  Normally I build 7 – 8 per year but my Boy Scout hours and other things have kept my modeling hours short.

I finished a Tamiya F4U-2 on the heels of the Monogram TBD I documented in a previous post.  This kit had some interesting challenges.

I built this kit once before many moons ago and it went together like a dream.  I decided to use a True Details resin cockpit on this kit and in my mind, it wasn’t that much of an improvement over the kit parts, and the trouble I had putting it in even detracted a bit from the overall completion.

Here are some comparisons between the kit and resin.  Other than the built-in seatbelts in the resin (which are out of scale), I think the Tamiya cockpit had crisper detail.

I also had a wild hair about using hairspray to do the chipping.  This had worked wonderfully on a previous build (see https://dlloseke.wordpress.com/2017/09/09/hasegawa-hurricane-mk-iic-night-hurricane/ ) but I had a couple of problems with this.

First, the original build was a single color aircraft.  To use the hairspray you paint the kit the chipping color (silver here) and then cover it with hairspray.  You then paint a water-based paint (I use Vallejo) and by wetting the paint before it is fully dry use a stiff paintbrush or toothpick to remove the chips (the hairspray “melts” under the top coat and allows the paint to be removed.

With the tricolor of the Corsair, I had to create multiple layers of paint which then were harder to remove.  Spraying the Vallejo too heavy in certain areas caused the hiarspray to melt under the wetness of the paint.  I think I overdid the chipping.

Two other issues; 1) if you are not careful the brush will remove a big chunk of paint all at once – oops, and 2) the Vallejo Sea Blue color did not cover the silver very well in thin coats which gave me more of a dark metallic blue top coat than the weathered flat sea blue I was trying for.

Finally, after decals,  the kit received an oil dot filter coat of paint and then my standard raw umber panel line was to grub it up.  Once dry that was followed by various pastel highlights to finish the weathering.

I enjoyed the Tamiya kit!

Next up, on to the desert!  Maybe I can get a couple more done before the end of the year!

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Wow, it’s November!

My last post was in June.  I just finished the TBD that I started early summer.  Normally I finish 7 or 8 kits per year, this year two so far.  I have to get moving here over the next month and 1/2.

Per my last post I am building an old Monogram TBD I found in a bag on eBay.  It turned out to be pretty good kit considering it’s age.  I didn’t put too much work into it other than rescribing the fuselage panel lines.  The extra work was around the corrugated wing panels which requires some fancy work on the leading edge with a round file between the raised detail to get rid of the seam.

The new thing to try was a concerted effort at pre-shading. The corrugated wing panels called out for it.  After decanting some primer from a spray can and using the airbrush to prime I used a dark grey to fill in the depressions around the ribbing as well as highlighting other areas.  Remember the pre-shading is designed to provide contrast when the paint is put on the model.  Here’s a view of pre-shading…

I used Vallejo Model Air to cover the model.  For this particular model the paint went on very well and the pre-shading highlights turned out great.

Decals were the Starfighter “TBD-1 Devastators in War Paint” and represent Ensign Gay’s famous aircraft in the battle of Midway.

A quick raw umber wash to dirty it up a bit and we are done.

Now to get crackin’ and get a few more done by the end of the year.